TheBeefSite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the beef industry

News

Future Proofing Queensland's Beef Industry

04 September 2008

AUSTRALIA - Dr Cobbold Protecting Queensland's profitable beef industry whilst reducing food poisoning outbreaks in humans is just one proposed project to be conducted within the Centre for Advanced Animal Science.

Located at UQ's Gatton Campus, the $33 million facility was today officially opened by the Minister for Primary Industries and Fisheries, the Honorable Tim Mulherin.

CAAS, a joint initiative between UQ and the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, is equipped with biosecurity containment facilities, allowing scientists to collaborate on projects which aim to safeguard the Australian agricultural industry and improve human health.


*
"Australia is the largest beef exporter in the world so there are direct economic benefits in maintaining its clean and green image."
Dr Rowland Cobbold, from UQ's School of Veterinary Science

Dr Rowland Cobbold, from UQ's School of Veterinary Science, hopes to utilise CAAS resources to test an E. coli vaccine for cattle.

“In collaboration with researchers from DPI&F, CSIRO Food Science Australia, Washington State University and the University of Idaho, we're proposing to develop a vaccine to be used in cattle which helps prevent food-borne diseases,” Dr Cobbold said.

“If that project goes ahead then the final stage would involve testing the vaccine in a level 2 biosecurity containment facility.

“Quite frankly, without CAAS we couldn't conduct this type of research.

“CAAS will allow us to trial this particular strain of E. coli under much more controlled experimental conditions.”

E. coli is a bacterium commonly found in the guts of most animals, including cattle.

Some strains of E. coli can cause severe food poisoning in humans.

Dr Cobbold said that while Australian cattle were largely free of food poisoning organisms, the proposed vaccine would future proof the beef industry.

“Australian beef is already considered better and safer than many other countries,” he said.

“Australia is the largest beef exporter in the world so there are direct economic benefits in maintaining its clean and green image.

“Keeping our beef marketable and free of E. coli will ensure consumer confidence.

“Disease due to this particular E. coli strain is not common in humans but can be severe if it does occur.”

TheCattleSite News Desk


Partners


Seasonal Picks

Managing Pig Health: A Reference for the Farm - 2nd Edition