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World's 1st On-farm E.coli Intervention Vaccine?

18 June 2008

SERBIA - Last weekend Canadian biopharmaceutical company, presented data regarding its latest E. coli O157:H7 cattle vaccine in Belgrade, claiming it is the first vaccine in the world that can be effectively used on-farm.

The producers of the vaccine say that it prevents the E. coli O157:H7 bacteria from attaching to the intestines of vaccinated cattle, thereby reducing their reproduction within the animal, and reducing the amount of bacteria that can be released through cattle manure in the environment.


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"Vaccination of an entire feedlot will have a dramatic effect on E. coli cycling in the feedlot"
Dr. Dragan Rogan, Vice-President, Bioniche Animal Health Research & Development.

They claim that the Bioniche vaccine is the world's first vaccine that may be used as an on-farm intervention to reduce the amount of E. coli O157:H7 shed by cattle.

Bioniche and its collaborators have been moving the vaccine towards commercial availability for eight years and it has been extensively tested at the University Nebraska-Lincoln, with efficacy results now being published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, most recently, the Journal of Food Protection, in November, 2007.

In his presentation, Dr. Rogan summarized numerous studies that have been completed with the Bioniche vaccine over the last five years involving more than 30,000 cattle.

According to him it has been identified that approximately 60% of cattle have more than 20% prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in the summer months, while only 10% have this level of prevalence in winter.

The results of studies conducted with the Bioniche E. coli O157:H7 vaccine indicate that winter shedding levels can be approximated by vaccinating summer-fed cattle. "This establishes proof-of-concept for vaccination as a useful pre-harvest intervention against E. coli O157:H7," said Dr. Rogan. "Vaccination of an entire feedlot will have a dramatic effect on E. coli cycling in the feedlot and, over time, has the potential to decrease the environmental load and subsequent re-infection with each successive cycle."

TheCattleSite News Desk



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